Cart preview

Your shopping cart is empty

Wishlist
Ship to
You've just added a product to your cart
VIEW CART
Sorry, we have only of available in stock. The quantity is automatically reduced to the max possible value.
We’re so sorry but the is available only in US, please remove it from the cart
is not available for shipping within the US.
VIEW AVAILABLE WINES
Some of the wines you've picked are not available in US. For shipping within US please
CHOOSE WINES FROM THIS LIST
You’ve just added a product to your wishlist
10 POINTS
You’ve just shared an article.

BIW Merga Victa pošip 2019

In the center of the island of Korčula, the freshwater ponds that feed the vineyards of the village of Smokvica are a remarkable gift of nature. Local people call this place “Merga Victa,” meaning “path for water” in old Dalmatian. Vineyards are located on the outskirts of Smokvica, the birthplace of Pošip. Local people have planted indigenous grape varieties on terraced fields carved out of rocky hillsides, fed by the water from the streams. Today’s winemakers do most of their work by hand, just like their ancestors.

Wine notes

Winery Black Island Winery
Country Croatia
Region Dalmatia
Variety Pošip
Category White wines
Bottle size 0.75 L
Alcohol 13 %
Production 40.000
Award Decanter Wine Awards 2020 - Silver
  • Acacia flowers
  • Citrus
  • Green apple
  • Herbs

A but crisp wine with a light body. Light yellow in the glass. Citruses and green apples on the nose. Balanced acidity, nice minerality. Fruity palate dominated by lemon and lime.

  • Casserol
  • Cured meat
  • Gnocchi
  • Hamburger

In the center of the island of Korčula, the freshwater ponds that feed the vineyards of the village of Smokvica are a remarkable gift of nature. Local people call this place “Merga Victa,” meaning “path for water” in old Dalmatian. Vineyards are located on the outskirts of Smokvica, the birthplace of Pošip. Local people have planted indigenous grape varieties on terraced fields carved out of rocky hillsides, fed by the water from the streams. Today’s winemakers do most of their work by hand, just like their ancestors.

Like what you read?

Subscribe today and be the first to read THE latest.